Louis Chenevert: On the Cutting Edge

Thanks to hard work and perseverance, Louis Chenevert has achieved the sort of career most executives dream of. After being appointed CEO of United Technologies Corporation at one of the lowest points in the American economy, he led the company to outlast former leaders such as Zenith and RCA, and become a dominant force in the heating, refrigeration and air conditioning department. The company’s aerospace systems unit produces a wide range of products, and its Sikorsky unit builds more helicopters than any other US company. But the crown jewel of Chenevert’s career was 20 years and 10 billion dollars in the making, the Geared Turbofan (GTF) engine.

The GTF is a huge technological breakthrough through for the aviation industry, and it was Chenevert’s foresight and progressive thinking that brought it to life. This engine is 16 percent more fuel efficient than other engines, reduces noise level by 75 percent and reduces emissions by 50 percent. In short, this engine has the potential to drastically improve aircraft design. There are currently 14 airlines using the GTF on 72 aircraft, which is no small feat and a giant feather in the cap of the man who spearheaded and cultivated the project.

While the GTF is an impressive accomplishment, Louis Chenevert has accomplished many other feats through the course of his career. He worked for over a year with the CEO of Goodrich to ultimately come to an $18 billion acquisition deal in 2010. He helped Pratt & Whitney win a lobbying deal which ultimately resulted in the company being the only supplier of the F35 engine. He was a key player in reworking a proposition with International Aero Engines and entering into a new venture with Rolls-Royce, which resulted in Pratt gaining full control of the alliance. During his time, UTCs Sikorsky team was recognized by the Collier Trophy for the development of the technology for the demonstrator of the X2 high-speed helicopter.

See Louis Chenevert speak here: